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the region and with the world as china looks at, a sense of harmony, japan would be law, that sense of harmony and how you would achieve it is that their frustration is that the work is not just acquiescing to the notion that they are a rich country, that they are returning, that they're powerful, that they want respect. and they want to see the world kind of step back and give it greater latitude, but doesn't see this. this is what i think whether i personally think we are on a collision course. because when you look at what china's expectations of the world are, you also look at its paranoia, you look at jim, i'd love to hear utah, you're such an expert insider, what's going on in the cyber world. you see something which seems hard to me, despite her best efforts in not one to replace history, that the rise of a great power usually and often leads to messiness. usually and often leads to conflict. let's get some conversation from those of you who are thinking sisley that this is supposed to be a no-nonsense forum on military and secret strategy. i don't want you to predict war, bu
things that could rap right now is the house could vote and the president would sign into law legislation that would provide certainty for middle-class families. 98% of american families, and some 97% of small businesses. so it's time for the house to act. secondly, i think we have to take steps to make sure that we're creating jobs at a faster pace, as i mentioned before. i'm introducing legislation today to help middle-class families and -- middle noik families and to boost hiring. it would expand the payroll tax cut from last year for one year and give employers a tax credit for hiring. and i'll be talking about that legislation. now, the payroll cut that we -- tax cut that we put into place last year had a number of benefits. i won't go through all of those today but the joint economic committee, the committee of which i'm the chairman, just put out a report in the last 24 hours, it's a fact sheet that highlights some of the benefits of the payroll tax cut. mr. president, just for the record i would ask consent that the joint economic committee fact sheet on the payroll tax cut dated
on the bill they just debated, changing federal energy efficiency laws. we'll take you live next to the capital, the chair and co-chair of the democratic caucus, just starting a briefing talking about the fiscal cliff and jobs. it's live here on c-span. >> and continues to preach the kind of message that i think the nation needs, one of compromise but one of assurity that we are going to be looking out tore the interest of the middle class and the protection of social security, medicare and medicaid for the people who are in such desperate need of those great programs that are the hallmark of our country. we have repeatedly said and our caucus again just confirmed that job creation equals deficit reduction, and we must put the country back to work. we have proposals that are on the floor. we still believe that even with the -- what little time remains and what little time remains when we're actually working, this is still possible. this is still doable. this is not a democrat or republican issue. republicans believe that america needs to go back to work. it's just a matter of hav
above the law. >> we want a free egypt. we won an agent for everybody. >> morsi is refusing to back up to pressure. and in the nation is ready for the referendum on time. if the people agree, they will start building institutions upon this foundation. if it is rejected, i will use my authority and duty to create a new constitutional assembly based on an agreement or on direct elections for a new assembly. >> the president's supporters have also been taking to the streets, this time for the funerals of two demonstrators who were killed in clashes with opposition protesters earlier in the week. meanwhile, the german foreign minister says the violence puts the legacy of the revolution at risk. m e to pose a political powers must come together in a dialogue. they must develop a dialogue, when it takes into account all elements of society. >> so far, the call is not being heated. the main opposition groups have rejected offers of talks on saturday. >> for more, we go live to cairo. we mentioned the reports that protesters have broken through the barricade at the palace. how tense is the sit
the president has gotten tougher than he was in the first term and he lays down the law again today. >> the thinking is that the republicans will have more leverage because there will be another debt ceiling and we'll extract with stronger leverage on the debt ceiling. i just have to tell you that is--that is a bad strategy for america. it's a bad strategy for your businesses. and it is not a game that i will play. >> cenk: damn! he's not going to play that game. i hope he means it. so we'll see how that turns out of course. now let's have some fun. let's bring in jude freeman. a conservative in los angeles. what happened, due get lost. >> and jewish, yes very lost. >> cenk: let's talk about boehner and the grand bargain. are you with the heritage who says it's too soft or does it make sense. >> grover norquist said we should film it all. republicans, democrats and just call it survival washington, and watch this for 24 hours as long as it takes them to work something out. >> cenk: yes, it's not going to happen, and i'll tell you why the guys who will block it are the republicans. i
in baltimore, and i think um, that changed when the law enforcement er, and the nixon administration, launched the war on drugs, and er, baltimore changed. and i've been in law enforcement now for over thirty three years. i think i've got a very good grasp of what's going on out here in the streets, and what needs to change. from the law enforcement perspective, we need to change our policies quick. >>the problem of drugs in colombia, have different characteristics from anywhere of in the world. and it's an international security issue. so our policy is very aggressive against all elements of drug trafficking. one of the elements is eradication. eradication of crops. air spraying, which was er the basic element of reduction of production. but in two thousand five, we started the process of manual eradication. it's more effective but you need the combination of both. of air spraying in many areas where it's very difficult. and manual eradication where where there is more territorial control. these talking points, that the right have, about the "heavy hand of government" ... i want to have that
is not going to obey the gun laws. they are going to find a gun or find another weapon. >> stretching and shooting to syria and chemical weapons seems like a bit of a stretch. the implications of that is that every american should have access to chemical weapons and nuclear weapons. it will result in weapons ownership. look at europe and the rest of the world. we are way, way out there. we have the highest murder rate in the world. >> abbey, here is what they say to me. each time it is the same debate and nothing gets done about it. 300 million guns and you have between 11 and 12,000 guns and murders a year. britain has 35 as does germany and australia. to countries that have strict gun kcontrol have little gun murder. i think carole had it right. she said it is about personal responsibility. that is the most important part. it is a difficult one. people are going to have an oh w pinion about it. we have to make sure that they were -- wanted the american people to feel protected about the british at the time. i don't think people should be able to go online and buy guns. there should
if congress does nothing, and president obama is the only person that can sign a bill into law and quite honestly, senator harry reid is the only person in the senate that can pass a bill in the senate as well. it sounds like people like howard dean want everybody's taxes to go up. maybe we should feel fortunate that president obama only wants the top two% to g two percent t. >> greta: do you anticipate republicans will vote for a rate increase if this should come to a vote? >> i don't believe they'll vote for a rate increase. what we'll vote for hopefully is to extend the current tax rates permanently and start working with president obama on true pro growth tax reform, but again, it sounds like treasury secretary geithner is happy to take the economy off the fiscal cliff, and again, if president obama wants to do that, he can do that, it sounds like that's exactly where he wants to go, what is kind of amazing, maybe republicans should take, you know, a victory lap from the fact that we've actually convinced democrats it's a good thing to maintain the bush tax cuts for at least 98% of t
it law. if signed into law, in fact, that would cause quite a problem pour those folks. michigan would join 23 other states. michigan is considered the birthplace of organized labor. it's now on the verge of becoming the 24th right to work state. thanks, everyone. suzanne malveaux is up next with "newsroom international." have a great day. >> welcome to "newsroom international." i'm suzanne malveaux. here's what's going on right now. a shocker on the jobs front. 146,000 new jobs added. that is almost twice as many jobs created in november than expected. the unemployment rate falls even further below 8%. we now have the lowest unemployment rate in four years at 7.7%. we're following the markets to see if it has an impact as well. cnn has now learned that pentagon officials are reworking their plans for possible military action against syria. that is after now confirmed reports emerging from syria that forces loyal to president bashir al assad are preparing bombs with chemical weapons. syrian soldiers fighting with rebels for control over the outskirts of damascus. now, witnesses tell cn
election. it would be nicer to get rid of it altogether. it is anachronistic law that is a problem. it creates a great deal of uncertainty. as you can see, it can do a lot of damage to the economy. there are a lot of reasons why it is being considered to eliminate that ceiling. it should be carefully considered. at the very minimum, we should push this to the other side of the election. we do not want to address the debt ceiling on a regular basis. it is damaging confidence. on fiscal sustainability, we need deficit reduction in the next 10 years of about $3 trillion. to get there, a balanced approach would be $1.4 trillion in tax revenue. half of that would come through tax reform and the other half through higher tax rates. $1.2 trillion in cuts to programs -- medicare and medicaid, social security, and other budget items -- that would leave you with approximately $400 billion in interest savings. at all of that together and you get $3 trillion. the spending cuts were implemented as part of the budget control act. if you add all of it up, if you go down the path i articulated, th
experience. he is a graduate of yale law school. he clerked for the conservative judge james buckley on the u.s. court of appeals for the d.c. circuit following graduation. so you have to ask why did it take seven months for the senate to finally after waiting seven months, we'll talk about it for 20 minutes, then we'll vote his nomination. why the seven-month delay? republican obstruction. now, after this vote, the senate remains backlogged with 17 judicial nominations that go back to before the august, the august recess. senate republicans are establishing another harmful precedent by refusing to proceed on judicial nominees with bipartisan support before the end of the session. they held up judicial nominees three years ago, they did it two years ago, they did it last year. now they are doing it again this year. they found a new way to employ their own trick of a pocket filibuster. they stalled nominees into the next year. and then they forced the senate in the new year to work on nominees from the past year. delay and delay and delay and push other confirmations back in time, then cut off
to a civilian leadership. how do you build a military that values rule of law, that values human rights, and can calculate that into come into its organizational construct and its training? and we can add values in those areas, and we're prepared to do that. >> we have time for two more. justin and then christina. >> justin with fox news. i wanted to ask you about the strategic shift to your region, the pacom region. are you concerned that this shift could be considered premature am considering there are still real problems in the middle east if you look at syria where the u.s. is at risk for being drawn into a serious conflict there, and weapons, there's obviously talk about iran as well. is the shift occurring before the job is done? >> well, i would go back to the presidency strategy on this, and take a look at it. didn't say that we would only, we reject everything we have in the military, across our government into the asia pacific. and prioritize the asia-pacific but also talked about the enduring requirement for us to be present and any security role in the middle east as well. so, you kn
and moldova. once this bill is signed into law, our workers, job creators and farmers will be able to take full advantage of russia and moldova's ascension to the w.t.o. -- accession to the w.t.o. the bill citrus strong enforcement provisions to ensure that russia lives up to its international trade obligations. finally this bill will help advance human rights and the rule of law in russia. today's vote would not be possible without the combined efforts of many dedicated public servants. first i would like to thank the staff at the office of the u.s. trade representative. many of them toiled for years to bring russia and moldova into the w.t.o., often at great personal sacrifice. i also would like to take a moment to thank my colleagues for all of their hard work in helping to craft this bill. an open and transparent dialogue was critical to our success. i would particularly like to again express my appreciation to all the members of the finance committee who worked with me and my staff to develop a strong package to develop many of the concerns we all have concerning our bilateral trade r
to be an expert in islamic law if you want to have a prayer of discussing laws. there's lots of things like that. that's what's angering a lot of these liberals. >> steve, do you think the islamists will be able to push this through? >> egypt is a country of stunning ironies. they have pushed it through. the question is whether people will accept it. i think this was all kicked off by the fact that revolutionaries, supporters determined that they were not going to allow the muslim brotherhood to run the table unchallenged. it's unclear whether they will be able to overthrow morsi but they want to teach him a lesson by coming out into the streets and saying we will no longer be ruled by decree. you cannot take away the rights that we fought so hard for during those days of january and february of 2011. >> if you think of it, egypt is the great experiment. everybody now understands democracy is not just elections. it's liberal constitutionalism. it's these documents. it's civil society. egypt seems to be going in the direction of not liberal democracy but illiberal democracy. >> right. you're abs
to work will pass the final vote on tuesday. we have hardworking people in michigan. >> the law makes union membership and dues optional in the heart of the rust belt. cradle of the organized labor. they insist they are not breaking the labor union because it does not target collective bargaining. this weakens their foundation. >> you have people alongside of you that won't pay the union dues if you pay the union dues but will still be able to get the benefit from being union member. >> spokesman for democratic caucus says to anticipate legal challenge is understatement. democrats will target the language in the laws. given the bill through the lame duck session and noisy demonstrators out of the chambers the democrats say they will challenge under the open meetings laws. >> they lied to us every step of the way and they are acting like cowards. >> he says it's leadership. >> baloney. >> as demonstrators storm the capitol, police used pepper spray. additional state troopers sent to lansing today with anticipation that the demonstrations will peak on tuesday. >> we want to keep things
in undergraduate hours, law school, or high school. i have learned more about history, government, the true history of this country. not what we have been spoonfed in high school. or in critical about the pleasant stories where we were happy with smiles on their face. where we have come from and how far we have come and how far we can go in terms of really being that bright and shining lfght for other countries to follow by example. host: is that it? caller: please, please, is there some way we can make texas c- span? they will not go on tv for people who are on satellite. we are bleeding republicans in this state with these voting machines. texas used to be such a good state to be from. host: what do you mean, make texas c-span? caller: i would like to see a c- span texas. i bet there are a lot of people and a lot of states that would like to see that. host: your earlier comments, can we use those for a commercial? thank you for calling in this morning. here is more facebook comments on our question this morning. keenan says -- john says -- sal says -- and ruben says -- don from book raton, hi, do
hit by threatening to cut jobs and working hours as a way to deal with the new healthcare law. darden restaurant group, owner of the olive garden and red lobster, just cut its profit forecast for the year, specifically citing failed promotions and the pr problem it encountered after admitting to limiting employee hours. under the affordable care act, companies with more than 50-full time employees are required to offer basic health coverage for workers or face a fine. other restaurant chains have also generated backlash after publicly complaining about obamacare. "i think the point is that the restaurant industry shouldn't expect to be able to have this advantageous position relative to many other industries that employ a lot of people and do pay healthcare benefits. and, quite frankly, it is the law, so we'll all have to deal with it and manage through it. that was restaurant consultant bob goldin of technomic. darden shares were down 10% yesterday. the founder of software company autonomy is on the defense. this week, autonomy founder mike lynch launched a website addressing allegat
was decidedly unamused. >> obviously, the vice, what the australian broadcaster did may well have broken the law. on the other hand, they've apologized for it. so we're going to have a long and careful think about what, if anything, we do. >> reporter: the station said it was the easier prank call it had ever made. >> when is a good time to come and visit her? because i'm the queen, so i need to get down there. >> i would suggest anytime after 9:00 would be suitable. >> reporter: easy for a nurse, what she's supposed to do when someone calls up saying it's the queen, ask for proof. what started as a story here about a difficult beginning to a pregnancy became more than that. it became one of a patient confidentiality and about humor, and about bad accents. >> thank you, mark phillips. >>> in egypt this morning army tanks are protecting the presidential papplace as the president prepares to speak to the nation tonight. at least five people killed overnight and hundreds wounded as opponents fought out the palace gates. more demonstrations are planned today in cairo. holly williams is there. holly,
, to say that he's been law enforcement for 30 years and bring back 30-year experience to this consideration of this bill, and he said this bill makes sense because drug treatment works and this is in spite of the fact we'll be battling the district attorneys along with many other arms of public safety. [laughter] >> we've got the data, we've got the facts and we know this will provide great benefit to our communities, to our neighborhoods, and to all of california. thank you for your support. [applause] >> tal, i want to go back to the question that marty posed earlier, which is in effect this idea that in order to incentivize people making the decision to seek treatment that the fear of a felony conviction or possible state prison sentence could play a positive role. you talk to a lot of people charged with crimes who are trying to make the decision of what decision to make, what is the primary motivation you see coming from them. how do they decision make on dispositions related to drug possession as a felony? >> i think that for a lot of people it does have to be a
in the courthouse when d.n.a. started coming into be used at the courthouse. prior to that many law enforcement and prosecutors had to rely on blood samples and fingerprints, but once d.n.a. came in and we learned everybody has a unique genetic makeup and it can be connected and traced to perpetrators of crime when they commit a crime, especially in sexual assault cases. and convictions have gone up. the evidence is better. the proof beyond a reasonable doubt is much more available in d.n.a. cases. in 1985, there was a 13-year-old girl named lavenia masters. she lived in dallas, texas. she told her folks good night. she went to her bedroom which should be, mr. speaker, the safest place on earth for children -- went to sleep and during the middle of the night she was woken up by an outlaw putting a knife to her throat and he sexually assaulted her. then he snuck away in the darkness of the night. that was in 1985. she went to the hospital. her parents took care of her medical needs. d.n.a. evidence was taken from her. it was given to the law enforcement authorities, but that d.n.a. evidence from
to take these young women when they are interacting with law enforcement because a lot of them find themselves into prostitution and get treated like perpetrators as opposed to victims. this is the psychology of a perpetrator but they are victims and we have to get law enforcement and our judicial system to treat these women as victims and put them in a setting to pull themselves away from drug addition. >> in a minute, politico is -- politico is going to ask you some questions. one of the questions that has come in, who is the best leader in washington, d.c.? >> robert griffin, iii. >> why did the majority of americans reject the republican party in the recent election? >> it was an election and it was a very close election. if you look at the nims and the differences between the two. i think the republican party can do a better job of limited government and freep enterprise movement and connect those policies. >> why has there been a failure to connect? >> i'm not sure there is one reason for it and i haven't had time to think about it why it has happened but it needs to happen. t
the gun laws. they are going to find a gun or find another weapon. >> i've heard of some stretches, in my time. but stretching from javon belcher and the shooting in syria and chemical weapons seems like a bit of a stretch. the implications of that is that every american should have access to chemical weapons and nuclear weapons. it will result in weapons ownership. look at europe. look at japan. look at the rest of the world. we are way, way out there. we have the highest murder rate in the world. it hasn't protected us. it has resulted in arguments that should have a consequence of maybe a slap in the face, resulting in a bullet through the heart. it results in a double-murder in this case, a murder/suicide. guns don't protect. they cause suicide. >> let me bring in -- >> they cause suicide? >> i can promise, i'll get back to you, carol. here is what they say to me. i've had it all. but trying to get a debate going. i've been on two years on cnn. in that time, there's been a series of gun rages. each time it is the same debate and nothing gets done about it. 300 million guns and you hav
people, voter i.d. laws a disproportionately affect us. if white people can go through all the laws, what are you telling back people? they are less than? that is what bothers me about rhetoric. we always have to make special --there has to be a specialist when we deal with minorities. it there too feeble mind it appeared we need to make concessions. they cannot follow the rules. we treat people like victims, i do not think they want to aspire. >> defense secretary leon panetta visited the walter reed medical center tuesday to celebrate the hospital's first anniversary. it was created out of the merger of the walter reed army medical center and the bethesda naval hospital. this is about 40 minutes. >> it is my true pleasure to welcome me here this morning. over a year ago to host a dedication ceremony for what was then the new walter reed medical center. you are words that many of us that day. he pointed out if his the people that can make the biggest difference. -- he pointed out that it is the people that can make the biggest difference. i would be happy to report to you that we stand b
rates are going up initiate. we're not, quote, raising them. that's current law. i think what the speaker has support, an you should look at the proproposal that he put out. every sungal one of our major leaders signed it. all the major committee chairman, including paul ryan, who obviously has an outside role. >> $800 billion worth of rev mew. >> this is a speak that's very strong, this is a speaker that got us through a tough election and retained our majority. i actually think this is a speaker at the prime of his power. it's not just about this period of time, it's about the next four years. the president is going to be president for the next four years, john boehner is likely to be president f-- speaker for for years. but the president needs john boehner more than john boehner needs the president. >> does the speaker have enough votes inside his caucus to agree to some kind of tax rate hike in the upper echelons of society, does he have enough votes that he can put together with whatever nancy pelosi can stir up and pass it? >> i'm not sure there's support for rate hike,
said in a law that they would pay that money back in a trust fund. but there is suspicion on whether that is rarely ever going to happen. that feeds into their concern about what will happen to social security. is it going to be changed in ways that affect the benefits? host: all of the calls to simplify the tax code, to streamline it, and that may certainly mean to itemize the credits of that take place on the tax returns. guest: the complexity of the tax system is a huge problem. everyone from the irs on down to congress and the industry out there, if you will, the financial accounting industry, everyone recognizes is an enormous problem and causes people to pay a lot more than they otherwise would. most people do not do their own taxes anymore because they are so complex. they rely on software that is kind of a black box. it is hard to know how the tax system works anymore. people do not have as much of an incentive to take a deduction if they do not know it is there. and the software is what they are depending on. host: does simplifying the tax code as necessarily mean lessening
the state of wisconsin, also pat houston, whitney houston's sister-in-law and manager and jeopardy champion ken jennings written a new book. it's tuesday, december 4th, "starting point" begins right now. >>> welcome everybody, you're watching "starting point." we're honored this morning to have the former british prime minister tony blair with us as our guest. he's going to be weighing in as a number of topics. we're going to talk about the fiscal cliff, we're going to talk about the global economy. we're going to talk about the civil war in syria. we'll talk about the royal baby coming soon. first we want to get right to zoraida sambolin for an update on the day's top stories. >> soledad, the fiscal cliff debacle, with 28 days remaining before drastic tax hikes and spending cuts take effect, a republican spending plan has been rejected by the white house. brianna keilar is live from washington. what now, brianna? >> well, right now it's about the pressure building and the clock kicking, zoraida. as house republicans in the white house try to ultimately broker a deal between two very differ
say i love you and a great day. watch out what else you text to family and friends. if law enforcement agency get their way there will be a law to keep your everyone of your private message for two years. those messages can be the key to solving crime. >> steve: does keeping those text violate the constitutional rights? fox news judge nan -- ann said absolutely. >> the government is looking for short cut to keep us safe and request them after a tragedy. so some nut shoots people in er there is a call for gun recall . tragedy with a young boy murdered in rhode island and there was text messages that would have pointed to the true killer and the police seized it and do so unconstitutionally. the whole purpose of the constitution is to protect us from a government that is too strong and aggressive to the point it is arrestting people on a whim and seizing their information on a hunch . the constitution was written to prevent that. the government comes along and police organizations are lobbying the congress for legislation that would require private telecoms and computer servers to retain
for energy information. we are by law -- it is supposed to be unbiased and neutral in our development of energy analysis, using the debt that we collect -- data that we collect. the annual energy outlook reference case, which were published today, is not really a forecast as it is a baseline. it is built on the idea of existing law and regulation so that the public and policymakers can compare what new laws and regulations or changes in world events might mean to our baseline. host: frank verrastro doggett is vice president of the energy program at the nonprofit center for strategic and international studies. who uses these eia projections? guest: the data sets the reference cases. they're not really pinpoints, because nobody gets 24 the right. but the trends are really important -- 2040 right. but the trends are really important. agencies around the world, universities, financial analysts on wall street, everyone uses these kinds of reports to look at what the forecast on this change in energy landscape looks like. host: we are taking your calls and questions for both mr. for siemins
. i graduated college with about $150,000 of student loans, between, you know, law school in undergrad. it was a combination of pell grants, stafford loans instant loans which i said last that i paid with the proceeds of my book, which is perfect for the holidays. available on amazon now. anyway, but i never would've been able to go to school without. it's that simple but if it wasn't pell grants and wasn't student loan programs i would not be a college graduate speak in your speech last that you talked about how fortunate we are to be where we are, who we are if you talk to how but for an accident, you in your dancing shoes. you pointed out you would probably be a very opinionated bartender. >> right. you think about my parents came to this country they were about to the unskilled and uneducated. by dad went to the fourth or something like that. my mom, not much more. they grew up -- they move to the united states in the 20 session. they were able to find jobs. they could own a house, a car, take vacations. we never had everything we wanted but we had more than what we need. that's an
, the broad context. we need to get rid of the debt ceiling law. it is agonistic. -- it is anachronistic. we need to get rid of it. i suggest that some version of the dollar for dollar rule should be incremented. at least considered. it does not need to be one-for- one. it could be 50%. that is not going forward. -- that is now going forward. my view is that we need to nail down how we can get to fiscal sustainability. -- the $3 trillion i proposed,get rid of the debt ceiling law. we need some form of budget rule to make sure that some discipline going toward. >> structure. >> yes, structure. we need to show people that we will stick to this plan. >> thank you. >> thank you very much for being here. i appreciate your testimony. dr. hassett, dr. zandi has indicated that he inks the debt limit crisis we had in august 2011 was bad for the economy and the country and that we should avoid it for the future. do you agree with that? >> first, yes. i think the best testament of this has been done by co- authors who have a very cool index of economic uncertainty. it is a very innovative paper. they e
misrepresented what i said. the supreme court is the law of the land. >> when i hear these accusations that black people -- voter i.d. laws disproportionately affect minorities -- it seems to me somehow we have something missing in our brain. to me, if white americans can go throughto voting all the processes to follow the laws, what are you telling black people? that somehow they are not good enough? that is what bothers me about a lot of the rhetoric coming from democrats and the left, that we always have to make special -- you know, there has to be a specialness when we deal with minorities because they are too feeble mind it. we really need to make concessions for them because they cannot follow the rules like everybody else. when you treat people like victims, then i do not think they want to aspire. >> more with the editor and publisher of conservativeblackchick.com on c- span's "q&a." >> business, political, and senior military leaders talked about alternative energy production and the country's dependence on oil. speakers included gene sperling, director of the white house international c
of 90% right now, that's current law and then continue to fight on the others, you know, i just think that's number one, the right thing to do. you don't punish the american people. you don't use them as hostages in a negotiation and i think it's smart politic. it's good negotiating because it moves most of this debate over to the spending and entitlement debate. >> i want to bring in congressman aelect. 39 senators in the in coming congress which you'll be apart of have signed the pledge, you are not one of them and you say you are not going to sign. is this a principle decision and grover norquist or the fact you don't like pledges or are you planning to support a tax hike on the top 2%? >> i didn't sign because number one, you know, the pledge i've made is i've made a pledge to my country to pledge allegiance to america, my wife. we've got a spending problem in this country and i think there's better ways that we can deal with that. >> i want to go back to congressman cole for a second. i'd like to take every opportunity i can to remind americans about what this pledge is. i've got
walker's part. i don't know if it is the same situation. stuart: michigan is a right to work law and the government is likely to sign it. looks like they will be the 24th ridge to work state in the united states. fracking is a way to get natural gas from shale thousands of feet underground. it is very controversial. some worry it affects the water supply and the environment. joining us now is any gruber from the environmental system, i am going to give you the chance to give a commercial here for your company. what you do if i am not mistaken is you clean the water which comes out of the ground after a capital to one operation takes place. that is what you do. is that correct? >> that is correct. stuart: this business is booming. >> business has been very good. we actually specialize in industrial waste water treatment. so we took an application that we use in the food industry and apply to oil and gas industry because both of them have one thing in common. stuart: environmentalists are concerned about fracking. if you inject this water and sand and chemicals the underground, you
four weeks to go until the deadline. be careful what you say in a local police want a law, new law requiring that text messages be saved for two years. how do you feel about that? ever texted something you wish would go away right now? there is of course the privacy issue as well. well, here comes the judge. he will be new at 10 on this one. got it. shares of darden restaurants, they're down today and they're the company that runs olive garden, red lobster, and they're down a lot. why is that, nicole? >> this is not good news here, they did a ton of promotions and now they're saying the promotions didn't work and in turn they're expecting numbers for the earnings season that will be below the analyst expectations and they're expecting sales at the olive garden to be down 3.2%. and at red lobster, 2.7% so sales are weakening, the earnings per share below what they anticipated and so, now, the ceo, so interesting, we need to come up with a new plan and we are going to work on different promotion because the current quarter is disappointing. do you think? >> well, nicole, hold on a se
organizations call the current law baseline. what that means is that what's scheduled to go into effect already is baked into the cake. and because the bush tax cuts are expiring provisions that were voted for ten years ago, it doesn't really count as a tax hike when they're already scheduled to take effect. so as long as republicans can just keep the revenue below what taxes would raise to in full expiration of the bush tax cuts, they won't be violating the pledge. >> kevin, that sounds incredibly reasonable. do you think grover norquist shares that interpretation? >> so there's an important distinction to be made between what the pledge actually says and what americans for tax reform, his activist organization advocates for. as grover said himself, the pledge is to the american people, not to grover norquist. so it's not just, you know, republicans need grover norquist's approval for what they want to do. it's more that americans for tax reform wants to keep tax rates low despite the fact that legislation says they're just going to go up no matter if congress doesn't do anything. >> all right
in egypt. but it just seems to me that morsi is turning out to be a radical. he wants sharia law to replace the secular state. he is not in favor of personal freedoms. he is not going to have a constitution that favors the kind of freedoms we thought they were going to go for. morsi's going to be a bad guy, is he not, marc? we'll have to contend with somebody -- >> larry, are you surprised? are you shocked? should anyone be shocked that the muslim brotherhood is after almost 60 years of waiting in the wings trying to finally seize power, trying to use the leverage of power, has bought off the army by candy-coating constitutional provisions to create a military state within a state? i'm not surprised at all. >> if he loses the referendum -- he's got a referendum. he says he's going to allow the referendum on december 15th. if he loses that referendum which ain't all that great for the constitution, but if he loses it, do you think he'll overturn it and just hold on to power as a dictator? >> i don't think in the end he's going to lose it because in the end, the muslim brotherhood has the gro
're helping other people. >> real quick, you're concerned about health care law, how is it going to play out in republican states moving in very different directions and really kind of in a full-scale resistance, not participating, not establishing many of them may not extend medicaid. how big a challenge is this going to be? >> we should implement this law. it's so important to american businesses. to make sure that access to affordable, meaningful health coverage. the law is written in a way that, and hopes the states and governors would include, we do the changes, the partnership between between the federal government and the state. have our governors be able to do this. governor christie doesn't want to do it. our own governor has declined to do it as well. that's disappointing. i do want to make sure that pennsylvanians are not, welcome disadvantaged by the decision to the federal government will have to come in and said that exchange exchange so they have access to affordable coverage. that's what this law is about. by private insurance in a way that has competition in it to reduce cos
-- the same accusation, that the revolution has been hijacked. >> he has put himself above the law. he has done everything to bring down his legitimacy. >> so a country that has once united against the dictatorship is now divided about how best to replace it. >> the unrest in egypt to the civil war that shows no signs of stopping in syria. today hillary clinton said the president's departure would be key to any transition. as efforts continue, so, too, does the blood shed on the ground. a prison in damascus is where some of the opposition are being held. this is the report. >> the soundtrack of the damascus state is shelling. the regime has the heavy guns. they are the first thing you hear in the morning and the last at night. armed rebels are dug into parts of the center around damascus. this is one of them. the rebels who filmed this and any civilians who have not managed to escape are being shelled steadily in the last few days. the shells keep the rebels back from the strategics strong point. the bbc was invited to visit its detention center run by air force intelligence. we were not a
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